CASL: Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation

When Reader’s Digest sends a touching email asking for consent, you may realize that something new has been happening in emails: more and more, consumers are getting the relationship question. Well, the business relationship question, anyway. Companies sending commercial electronic messages are now asking for explicit client consent to continue marketing products and services to Canadians.

As a consumer, this newfound respect is certainly intriguing (and, in the case of some relentless spammers, possibly unnerving). But there is a reason for it. As of July 1, 2014, CASL, Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation, is now in effect. The law is intended to provide strong protections for consumers against the most damaging spam and threats, while limiting the impact on Canadian businesses. By providing a legal mechanism to obtain express consent from existing clients, businesses retain the ability to responsibly send marketing messages and compete on the global stage.

This is great news for consumers and businesses alike. However, if you are in business, you need to know what your business may or may not do to be compliant under this significant new legislation. In fact, anyone who makes use of commercial electronic messages needs to be aware of CASL.

See below to download a visual overview of CASL.

Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation

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Importance of Consumers to Regulatory Compliance, Performance and Outcomes

Consumer preferences, purchasing decisions, voice and exit make major contributions to regulatory compliance, performance and outcomes.

Consumer preferences, purchasing decisions, voice and exit make major contributions to regulatory compliance, performance and outcomes. Over the past nine years, an associate of Delsys Research has been a senior consultant and advisor to Industry Canada on consumer policy, laws and regulations. The research related to this work has emphasized how the insights from behavioural, institutional, innovation and other economics literatures, which relax and go beyond the perfectly informed and rational agent model of conventional economics, can increase our understanding of consumer behaviour, preferences, decisions, responsibilities, vulnerabilities, learning, literacy and contributions to regulatory compliance and performance.
The following link provides readers with access to a short article which summarizes the topics addressed in this consumer research program and their implications for competition, innovation, business competitiveness, and regulatory compliance and performance.

With Contributions from Craig Marchand and Katie Cassidy
 
Consumer_Behaviour.pdf 

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